01 Aug 2016

I understand the frustration folk’s have with the political system. Far too long we’ve deferred to a two party system that has use Black lives as political fodder at best, and has exploited and marginalized us since it’s inception. I think our voting power is most realized in the local elections. We have, and can continue to, push candidates on their agendas. Whatever gains we have made on the national stage is because of the organizing work. A part of continuing this work, for me, includes voting for the landscape we want to do the work.

Cherrell Brown
Community Organizer

01 Aug 2016

For too long, Black women have delivered Democratic and progressive victories at both the state and national level, only to find our collective voting power ignored during post-election analyses. Victories that belong to Black women are diluted and become victories for all women. (Even though the majority of white women are Republican voters.) And for too long, the promises that political candidates make to us during election season are forgotten the day after Election Day. But over the past 8 years—since we had the highest voter turnout rate in 2008 and 2012—our electoral power has become such a force that candidates and party institutions can no longer ignore us. For example, candidates were forced to address Black Lives Matter, a movement spearheaded by Black women, because the candidates couldn’t afford not to. And there more Black women working on Hillary Clinton’s campaign than any other presidential campaign in history. By voting, Black women are making our voices and presence heard and changing the country for the better.

Imani Gandy
Senior Legal Analyst at Rewire and co-host of This Week in Blackness Prime